Digital Humanities for Medieval Studies

This course serves as an introduction to the practice of digital humanities in the field of Medieval Studies. The goals of the course are threefold: --to explore the conceptual terrain of digital humanities and to become familiar with debates about digital humanities; --to learn a series of basic skills in digital humanities practice, including tools for digitizing manuscripts (XML and TEI); text analysis and statistics (Voyant, Wordhoard, and others); text analysis in Python; stylometry; topic modeling; network analysis and visualization; 3D modeling; and resources for publishing and presenting research; --to explore the extensive world of digital humanities projects in Medieval Studies, in a range of fields from literature to history to art history to musicology to manuscript studies and more.

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Media, Ecology, Migration

This seminar will read theories of old and new media through the lens of two conceptual frameworks environmental criticism and migration studies. Tracing the effects of movement and stillness, interaction and connectivity from early cinema to social media and new forms of data visualizations, participants will develop their own research projects and methodologies by relating questions arising from theory to practice.

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VR and its Prehistories: The Art and Science of Transplanar Images

This course will investigate 3d images from their development as a popular photographic medium in the nineteenth century to their current digital reemegence. We will closely study the optics that structure transplanar images and learn how to make or own. We will also examine 3D moving images in cinema and video games, the challenges and opportunities facing the current VR/AR market, and new visualization strategies that 3D affords for medicine, psychology, manufacturing, and cultural heritage.

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Transnational Cinemas: Selling the Self

n times of post-truth politics, this course focuses on imposter tales, analyzing performances of social roles and national identities across multiple media and genres. Considering classic tales of “clothes make the man” from H. C. Andersen and F. Kafka, films such as Imitation of Life and Catch Me If You Can, as well as acts of posing and exposing on TV, YouTube, and digital social media platforms, students learn to think critically about rank and power, authenticity and artifice, staging and acting. Theories on the presentation of self and framing social interaction will guide our analyses. Epitomized by the word “selfie,” “selling the self” is an all-encompassing social practice that governs life and politics.

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(Re)presenting Humanity at the Margins: Curating and Visualizing Cultural Memory in the Digital Humanities

We Live in a time of Black and Brown erasure, even as emergent digital technologies are lauded as promising tools for visibility, mobilization, and liberation. As researchers in a digitized and interconnected world - where the boundaries between our virtual and "real life" contexts are increasingly blurred and where our understanding of our humanity is constantly mediated through digital artifacts and too.s - we are presented with pressing questions:

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Art in Public

This seminar explores art’s public presence in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present. Class sessions will consider works ranging from monumental sculptures and murals to performances and ephemeral expression, focusing on how various audiences have understood, valued, and contested the “use” of art in their public lives. Through readings, discussions and visits to sites around the Bay Area, we will investigate how place and community might instantiated in, formulated through, or defamiliarized by artworks.

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Digital Ancient Near East

Today, much of the information we gather on any topic comes from Internet sources. The goal of this class is to increase students' skills in critically evaluating the scholarly value of information on the Ancient Near East that is to be found in web pages, e-journals, and online books. We will consider the goal and context of sources of information (touristic, commercial, scholarly, religious, etc.) and how this influences and filters the information provided. Although the class will focus on Internet resources, we will not neglect to use the same critical eye when using print media.

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How Does History Count? Exploring Japanese-American Internment through Digital Sources

On February 19, 1942, Executive Order 9066 authorized the detention of around 110,000 people of Japanese descent, most of them American citizens living on the west coast. On the basis of ethnicity alone, having committed no crime, and given no trial, they were stripped of their rights and forcibly relocated to several detention centers, where they lived for up to four years surrounded by barbed wire and watched by armed guards. Many documents, images, and other materials that survive from this terrible episode of U.S. history are now available online. In this data science connector course, students will learn emerging digital methods for conducting historical research, which they will apply to the study of Japanese-American Internment. Classroom exercises will be hands-on and involve working directly with primary sources, using and expanding upon skills learned in the Foundations of Data Science class.

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