Join us for DH Faire 2018, kicking off Monday, April 2nd! Check below for details on this year's exciting line-up. 

The DH Faire is an annual event that brings together digital humanists to share their work and reflect on the field more broadly. Including a series of panels, a poster session, and an evening reception, the faire offers the Berkeley community the opportunity to share projects at various stages of development, and to receive invaluable feedback from peers.

 

SCHEDULED EVENTS

DH FAIRE RECEPTION AND POSTER SESSION 

Mon. April 2, 5:00 - 7:00 PM | Morrison Library, 101 Doe 

Help us kick off the 2018 DH Faire by enjoying refreshments with colleagues and browsing posters on recent DH work in Berkeley's Morrison Library. 

Sign-Up Here to present a poster

All digital scholarship projects are welcome. All members of the UC Berkeley community are invited to participate. Projects can be completed or in progress. The D-Lab will print student posters for free if sent to us (Email jtorres2@berkeley.edu) by Wed, 3/28. Deadline for signing up is Wed, 3/28

 

DIGITAL SCHOLARHSHIP IN THE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES 

Wed. April 4, 9:30 - 11:00 AM | Doe Library 180 

The Library collaborates with digital humanities research and initiatives through digital publishing, digitization, preservation strategies, metadata creation, subject expertise, instruction, and much more. Come hear from librarians and archivists Mary Elings, Cody Hennesy, and Josh Quan on the ways they have engaged with digital scholarship both within the Library and on campus.

 

DH FAIRE KEYNOTE: THE LONG RISE OF WORD VECTORS IN THE DIGITAL HUMANITIES

Wed. April 4, 4 PM - 5:30 PM | Academic Innovation Studio (117 Dwinelle)

Join us for DH Faire's keynote speaker David Bamman, Assistant Professor at the Berkeley School of Information. 

Distributed representations of words -- where a word is represented not by its identity but rather by the distributional properties of the contexts it appears in -- are in many ways responsible for the significant gains in accuracy that many applications in natural language processing have witnessed over the past five years, and have driven many interesting applications in the computational humanities.  While widespread interest in such representations took off in 2013 with the release of word2vec (Mikolov 2013), distributed representations have a much longer history, arising out of an appreciation of context advocated not only by Wittgenstein, Harris and Firth but also by a millenium of lexicographers and concordance-makers.  In this talk, I'll outline the history of distributed representations of words to their height today, and unpack what's new about contemporary (neural) methods of learning such representations compared to previous approaches.  By focusing on the fundamentals of representation learning, I'll also discuss how we can incorporate other forms of extra-linguistic information into the representation for a word (such as time, geographical location, or author identity) and use that more complex representation for linguistic reasoning as well.

 

THE PAST IS PRESENT SYMPOSIUM: VIRTUALITY, ARCHAEOLOGY, AND THE FUTURE OF HISTORY

Wed. April 4 - Fri. April 6 | Spring 2018 Symposium

 

Exhibition Preview: Deep Dive Or the Limits of Immersion

Wed. April 4, 5:30-7:30 PM | Worth Ryder Gallery, Kroeber Hall 

Join us for a reception to celebrate the opening of a VR exhibition around art, archaeology, and architecture, featuring virtual reality works by artists Joseph Mckay, Marcos Lutyens, Lauren Moffat, Momoko Seto, Shezad Dawood, Greg Niemeyer, Asma Kazmi, Olivia Ting, and Jill Miller. Registration encouraged. 

Curated by Asma Kazmi. Hosted by Art Practice. Sponsored by Digital Humanities at Berkeley.

 

Symposium: Virtuality, Archaeology, and the Future of History

Thurs. April 5, 10:00 AM -5:00 PM | 310 Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall 

The symposium features scholarly presentations on topics such as Documenting Archaeology and Architecture; Accessing history through Drawings, Plans, Casts, and Copies; and Academic, Public, and Pedagogical Priorities for the 21st Century.

Speakers include: Christophe Girot (ETH Zurich), Nicolo Dell'Unto (Lund University), Elaine Sullivan (University of California, Santa Cruz), Eugenie Shinkle (University of Westminster), Benjamin Porter (University of California, Berkeley), Adam Lowe (Factum Arte), Brendan Cormier (Victoria & Albert Museum), David Gissen (California College of the Arts), Jennifer Stager (City College of California), Maurizio Forte (Duke University), Rachel Opitz (University of Glasgow), Stuart Eve (University College London), Sonia Katyal (University of California Berkeley)

Register here.

3D Laser Scanning, Imaging, and Virtual Reality for Cultural Heritage and Archaeology

Fri. April 6, 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM | Archaeological Research Facility (ARF)

Short presentations beginning at 1pm, followed by hands-on demonstrations with scanners, VR goggles, and other equipment by representatives from numerous organizations and vendors.

 

TRACKING THE CONCEPT OF GOVERNMENT, 1700-1800: A COMPUTATIONAL ENQUIRY 
Mon. April 9, 3:00 PM -5:00 PM | Visual Resource Center, Doe Library 308A 

The University of Cambridge Concept Lab conducts computational analyses of large historical datasets, so as to account for the emergence, mutation and decay of concepts over time. We will showcase a range of techniques that build upon and refine procedures common to corpus linguistics, such as pointwise mutual information. We will also chart a number of specific case studies, using the large dataset of Eighteenth Century Collections Online so as to demonstrate how such an approach might differ from more conventional, analogue forms of intellectual history. The talk will be of interest to data scientists, intellectual historians and literary scholars. Co-sponsored by the UC Berkeley Department of English and the Computational Text Analysis Working Group.

 

SPONSORS

This event is co-sponsored by Digital Humanities at Berkeley, D-Lab, Berkeley Center for New Media, Hearst Museum, Townsend Center, The UC Berkeley Libraries, and the Visual Resources Center.